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Kick-ass Divas in the Land of Nod

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To CBD or not to CBD - it’s an increasingly popular topic of conversation these days. Most of us have come to believe in the efficacy of the cream for aching backs, but the jury is out on whether it can cure a whole range of afflictions from epilepsy to anxiety. The healing attributes of so many herbs and tinctures seems to ride a thin line between knowledge and faith; then again both are pretty potent integers, whether you are contemplating a cocktail or coping with daily life.

What I can offer definitively is that our two new summer drinks are trippy, for all the right ‘restorative’ reasons. Flower Child uses vodka made from a distillation of hemp seed from Humboldt Distillery, where they know a thing or two about Cannabis Sativa L. There is nothing psychotropic in the spirit, which is earthy on the nose, slightly resinous on the palate. Chappy, our wine director, who also takes great interest in our cocktail program, said from the get-go that a martini was the only way to go with the distinctive flavor of “Humboldt’s Finest,” but our bartenders, notably Terra, disagreed. By adding a hint of tarragon infused Noilly Prat vermouth, a skosh of peach bitters, muddling cucumber coins in fresh lime juice and an exuberant shake, she came forth with a truly surprising cocktail. While we may not be entering a summer of love in this country, all the more reason a little liquid joy in the glass is not amiss - which Terra has supplied in this cocktail. It’s intriguing, it’s new, and its pretty pansy and cornflower garnish comes from right here in the gardens.

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I am on record for initially turning my nose up when I heard the ingredients in our other new cocktail - I honestly thought there was no way it could work. Not only does it work, it’s one of my favorite concoctions. The artful way Alessandra has combined seemingly refractory flavors is secondary to the fact it is simply delicious, without being simple. The drink starts with a St George Chili Vodka, to which she added liquefied corn (aka corn water, puréed and strained) and Falernum, an Orgeat-like liqueur from the Caribbean with hints of ginger, lime and almonds. Lost you yet? It’s also got a Mezcal spray which lightly coats the glass before the liquid is poured, and a stellar Piment d’Ville salt rim. The Piment d’ Espelette we are using is grown and refined in Boonville by Johnny Schmidt, a friend for over forty years. You can purchase it at The Boonville Hotel in Anderson Valley or cage it online. This is a product that’s good for just about anything that ails you, and, as Alessandra proves, it makes the perfect rimmer.

Not from Kansas Anymore would have been a cool name for the drink - the creaminess of the corn water is key to the drink’s elevation of the Falernum- but that was too easy- Alessandra’s ingenuity demanded more. Then something the brilliant theoretical physicist Lisa Randall said in an interview with Krista Tippett in the always wonderful podcast On Being struck me: “we can go beyond our prejudices about things that seem obviously wrong…as they may just be obviously wrong to us.” In her new book Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, Randall writes about what she believes is the astounding interconnectedness of the cosmos’ history and our own, fascinating, but the take away she sparked in me with this interview was that there are profound connections to be made all the time, whether we are setting about unraveling the mysteries of the universe’s hidden dimensions or just getting on with our daily lives. “The most interesting kind of creativity is constrained creativity, where you have some rules. There’s certain formulas that you have to stick to, at some level, but within that framework, can you make it interesting? Can you see how things fit together in more complex and surprising ways?” The journey I made from an initial flat reading of the ingredients in Alessandra’s drink to what she actually created was a lesson in constrained creativity, and for staying open, not letting assumptions impede passage to something interesting, revelatory, joyful. Warped Passage, the name of Alessandra’s drink, was borrowed from an earlier Lisa Randall book. Read her.

We are proud to have four distinct divas guiding our bar programs (yes, we are looking at you too, Andrew). Come in and meet them. Not dining? No problem, it’s a big bar, with a lovely garden. We will help you confound gravity.

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The Gallery Garden Opens for Summer

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The Gallery Gardens are usually home to our elegant wedding receptions and private parties so it was a particular thrill to see them filled with local families and well behaved dogs this past weekend as we officially kicked off summer with two Memorial Weekend garden parties. We had an exotic menu, a rockin’ all girl band, great beer and sangria, and with the exception of a brief rainstorm Sunday, clear skies and sunshine to enjoy. One visitor who traveled up from LA quipped “Well, this is certainly not the Beverly Healdsburg we keep reading about.” Indeed. Our goal is to keep The Gallery Garden open through summer when not otherwise booked, including Mondays, when Chef Randy Dodge (seeing double, above) will create off-the-menu specials. Thursday through Sunday we will continue to serve his scrumptious Mediterranean menus - but expect the return of one or two Barndiva favorites (the BD burger is back!)

Huge thanks to all our chefs, notably Randy, Danny and Shae, who took my Shawarma challenge to heart - and most especially to brilliant Healdsburg sculptor Jordy Morgan whose vertical spit-roast Bicycle Grill must be seen - and the succulent results tasted - to be believed.

The brilliance of vertical spit-roasting is that whatever protein you slide onto the giant stake will self baste over time, fat melting down as the spit rotates. As soon as a gorgeous char develops you can start carving; feed the fire, wait a bit, then carve some more. Jordy’s ingenious spit-roaster even has three levels, the better to spread the wood fired heat. Our Shawarma was grass-fed Preston lamb shoulder which had been ‘marinated’ in a spice and citrus peel rub for 36 hours. Jordy carved and Randy stuffed his signature flat breads with tzatziki sauce, feta and onions all day Monday, to gratifying oohs and ahhs. Randy’s promises to keep his flatbreads on the new Gallery menu, along with another sell-out dish- his fried chicken with killer Barndiva Farm BBQ fig sauce. He is also planning daily garden specials and signature salads. Check out the new gallery menu here.

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Barndiva’s chef de cuisine, Danny Girolomo with Randy Dodge, who has taken charge of The Gallery kitchen in the studio. Bromance going on here, folks.

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Grillmaster Jordy Morgan has agreed to leave the Bicycle Grill in The Gallery Garden through summer. He’s an increasingly busy man these days, but if a commission intrigues him, he may just find the time to build you one. Contact him through Studio Barndiva.

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We are huge fans of Seismic beer because yes, it’s delicious. But our admiration also extends to the fact that it builds on the founder’s commitment to a grain to glass sustainability. Seismic’s Anthony Ayez (shown above) was on hand to serve Namazu Oat Pale Ale and Alluvium Pilsner, which we will continue to serve in The Gallery Garden (Thurs- Mon, 3pm on). Chef Girolomo and our wine director Chappy Cottrell are already planning a special Seismic Brewing Company paired dinner party in August. Stay tuned. @sommtablehealdsburg for details.

While the grill masters sipped Negronis, most guests imbibed Isabel and Terra’s white and red sangria. It’s a misnomer that you can use anything less than an excellent wine if you want to make great sangria, quite the contrary, but you do need wines with great texture and earthiness, the better to hold up to fresh citrus and light spice. We tapped Rootdown Cellars for the wine because we love that Mike Lucia’s approach to every wine he makes is reflective of his respect to the same indelible landscapes Barndiva draws from in Mendocino and Sonoma County. His focus is on varietal wines from single organic vineyards, fermenting with native yeasts, using no new oak and sulfur only in amounts equal to what is found naturally on the vine. For our sangria we used his ‘Es Okay’ Portuguese grape red blend and Pinot Gris white, all from Mendocino.

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Barndiva’s pastry chef Shae made both walnut and classic pistachio baklava. She wasn’t the only one who teared up when a long time Egyptian patron, after tasting one, told her it was as good as his late Mother’s.

#wearefamily: Gallery bartenders Isabel and Hayden; Lou and Susan Preston enjoying (literally) their Lamb Shawarma; Randy and Jordy stoking the fires and making flatbread; K2, who assists in all Barndiva creative projects, enjoying the day with her lovely daughter Teagan. Below, Monse, who will help guide The Gallery Garden bar, with Jessica and Christina, two of our essential - and favorite- long time back waiters.

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The consummate musicians that comprise Foxes in the Henhouse: Alice Fitzwater; Pamela Joyce; Hanna Jern-Miller; Dorian Bartley. This is soulful Americana with historical roots, interpreted in a thoroughly modern and joyful temperament. If you fell in love with them on Monday - how could you not - we urge you to check out their upcoming performances.

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Monday is the beginning of the weekend for us here at the Barn, as it is for so many in the hospitality industry, and we hope to see familiar faces with our new Gallery schedule. No reservations are needed, but it’s best to call on Fridays and Saturdays in case we are closed for a private event. Bring the kids, the dogs, or come alone to booze, schmooze and have a bite to eat. Chappy will be opening magnums, and we’re happy to waive corkage if you bring your own.

Here’s the new Gallery menu for Thurs-Sun. Don’t forget to come to Off-the-Menu Mondays. The Gallery Garden opens at 3pm.

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Drink Spring!

We are very excited to share four new Spring Cocktails, photographed here in the Barndiva and Gallery gardens, where clear skies and a surfeit of sunshine has hurtled us into the heart of the season. Not a moment too soon.

Cheers.

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Bachelor Buttons and mint from our raised beds brighten Terra Greathouse’s “Barefoot Julep”, a fresh take on this classic bourbon cocktail. It makes great use of the farm’s apple cider vinegar in a seasonal fruit shrub with wonderful herbaceous notes from muddled basil. This drink is long and elegant, like the gal who created it.

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Wisteria is in full bloom here at the moment, and those vibrant lilac hues carry over into “My Little Bebop Pony”, Andrew Radabaugh’s contribution to the Spring List. Butterfly Pea Flower give this drink it’s extraordinary color, with St. George’s Raspberry Brandy, Citrus Vodka, a dash of Peach Bitters, fresh lemon juice and a color coordinated garnish of pansies from the gardens. The Sour Raspberry sugar rim is another clue to the My Little Pony connection, but the Bebop is all about Andrew, whose infectious spirit is as uplifting as spring.

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Historically, we do not favor sweet cocktails so this simply elegant libation from new bartender Alessandra Ziviani hits all our favorite bitter notes, hence the name, “Bitter ‘Burg”. A sloe gin based drink with Nonino Amaro and Bruto Americano lending it depth and a caramelized nose. Alessandra works days at Preston Family Farm and Vineyards; she is very much a woman with her feet in the soil, reflected in the cocktail’s rich earthiness. We are very pleased she has joined our pirate ship. Fennel garnish from our gardens.

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Isabel Hales’ ephemeral cocktail makes surprising use of Datu Puti, a Thai drinking vinegar which she’s infused with fresh rhubarb, a great foil for Benham’s, one of our favorite local gins. The mysterious lingering flavor upon first, second and third sips is Reisetbauer Carrot Liqueur; dehydrated rhubarb and carrot slivers garnish the drink. The name, “Bod Electric” is a nod to Walt Whitman’s “I Sing the Body Electric,” which speaks to a life long desire to connect essential elements: our bodies to our souls, and both to the energies which always surround us. Not a bad thing to ponder as you sip your way through this glorious spring. Or you could take the name as an ode to Isabel, as electric as they come.

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These layered, nuanced cocktails are all available in Barndiva. If you prefer experiencing some of the world’s finest artisan spirits on their own or in classic libations perfectly executed, head over to The Gallery in Studio Barndiva where you can check out a “framed” curated collection, wander the gardens drink in hand, or just plop down into a sofa and watch exquisite old film clips while listening to the best playlists in town. Different strokes. Satisfaction guaranteed.

Enjoy.

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The Gang's All Here!

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Pink Party Participants, 2019

They came, they poured, they talked - all of which they do all the time with great panache and patience. On Sunday they also donated wine for our raffle which raised money for Corazón Healdsburg. This is a great group of what I would call graciously competitive winemakers and tasting room managers - who make working a room (or in this case, gardens) seem easy. Perhaps because while it is work, they actually love what they do, and where they get to live while doing it. So here’s to that. Raised glasses to all. We love throwing this memorable Spring Party.

Here is the complete list of some of the smiling faces above in case you can’t pick them out in the crowd! Most have tasting rooms…connect the dots ad go visit! Many of their wines are also on our lists here at Barndiva. Come Visit!

Banshee Wine * brick & mortar wines * Campesino Cellars * Claypool Cellars * Pachyderme Wine * Copain Wines * County Line Vineyards * Crux Winery * Domaines Ott * Dutton-Goldfield Winery * Enfield Wine * Ernest Vineyards * Flowers Winery * Gail Wines * Gary Farrell Winery * Guthrie Family Wines * Handley Cellars * Idlewild Wines * Joseph Jewell Wines * La Pitchoune Winery * Lioco Wine * Littorai Wines * MacRostie Winery * Mauritson Wines * Moshin Vineyards * Peay Vineyards * Preston Farm & Winery * Raft Wines * Reeve Wines * Relic Wine Cellars * Roederer Estate * Satyre Wines * Scribe Winery * Smith Story Wine Cellars * Sophie James Wine * Spire Collection * Fieldstone Vineyards * Trail Marker Wine Co * Unti Vineyards * West + Wilder

Pretty out front, while behind the scenes….

Pretty out front, while behind the scenes….

Incredibly, we had over 80 superlative Rosé wines to pair with food that flew out of our kitchens (some wineries brought more than one.) A huge Thank You to chefs Danny Girolomo, Randy Dodge, Ashell Cunningham, Thomas Mulligan, Francisco Alvarez and their entire team. We are so proud of the food Barndiva is producing. Every day.

Spinach Wrapped Beet Cured Salmon Lollipops * Housemade Duck Prosciutto w/ Boursin, Cherry Compote, Crostini * Dashi Tamago w/ Wakame Powder, Kewpie Mayo, Calabrian Chili, Shiso * Tuna Tostada w/ Avocado, Pickled Fresnos * Beef sliders w/ Pickles & Ale Mustard * Housemade Pizza Fritta w/ Truffled Artichoke Pesto, Journeyman Salumi, Parmesan Crema * Mini Ham & Cheese Hoagies * Raspberry Rosé Scented Macaroons * Rosé Sorbet Shooters….

Special shout out to Natalie Nelson and her engaging event staff, and to Chappy Cottrell, our extraordinary wine director. Special love to the incredible Bonnie Z of Dragonfly Farm, who augmented the flowers we brought from the farm and made a few of her extraordinary arrangements. To Dan, who always exceeds expectations, for his stunning floral wall. And thank you Isabel, who stepped in and saved the day in multiple ways and Matt Iaconis for donating brick & mortar Rosé for our shooters. And big love always to our good friends Dj Jeremy and the gorgeous Janine (brains of the family) without whom The Pink Party simply would not groove in quite the same way.

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Finally, kuddos to all our guests for showing up in such great style, ready to celebrate a very pink spring. You were just the right amount of sassy, and we were pleased with the mix of familiar faces with many new ones in this sold out crowd. Tracebox was a hit (winners will be notified) but even if you didn’t get a change to ‘game your nose’ this Sunday, no worries, we keep the Traceboxes fragrant in the SommTable room in The Gallery (where we usually tell you what you are smelling).

Thank you to all who donated to the raffle. The fact that we were very blessed to enjoy a day like this one is not lost on any of us here. When we talk community, and there is a lot of that going around in Healdsburg these days, we are only as strong as our most vulnerable. Row on.

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By six in the evening on Sunday, when our intrepid office manager Cathryn Hulsman took this shot, it did not look like over 300 people had been mingling, drinking, eating, laughing, and launching into the first great weather of 2019. If you missed it, or are already ready to plan another day with us here in the gardens, fear not! Fête Blanc is up next! Get your tickets as soon as you can. The Pink Party was very sold out.

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What is the Difference, You Ask?

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OK, here goes: One is sun-splashed by day, a long graceful room which lends itself to a candlelit flirtatious elegance by night. The other is speakeasy dark, with deep leather armchairs and french antiques, the kind of place where you can turn the music up and kick back. Look, we admittedly traffic in these descriptions of how The Barn and The Gallery differ - but the truth is they don’t really answer the question of where you’d rather be on any given day or evening. Talented chefs, check. A focus on seasonality, check. Sourcing locally, whenever we can, double check. These are dining rooms after all, where you come to eat. Yet I’d venture that while the savor of the meal is the ultimate litmus test when one dines out, and while we all crave enticing spaces, we return only if we’ve been taken care of, body and spirit.

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If you don’t need a bit of cosseting for a few hours these days, I’d like the name of your therapist or yoga master. Life, for all its joys, can be bloody hard. The living of it. The making sense of it. We dined at a ‘fabulous’ restaurant in NY recently where we were made to wait before being seated cheek by jowl on designer friendly butt numbing seats, rushed through a meal wherein we could barely hear ourselves think much less talk. I honestly don’t remember if the food was good or not. At some point it became immaterial. Nobody around us seemed to mind - or did they? Dining out should not be an Emperor’s New Clothes conundrum. Food is social communion. The nourishment we seek longs to satisfy all our senses.

Frank Bruni’s article in the NYT recently made the case for ‘older’ diners needing a familiar, softer experience; where the food was not a challenge so much as a return to flavors that made them happy. Call it old fashioned. Call it whatever you want, he’s not wrong, except- it isn’t just older folk who want to be cared for, not just fed. It’s a desire we see in anyone of any age who arrives at your door willing to give you a few hours of their precious time and part with money in exchange for leaving refreshed and truly satisfied. A tall order, for sure. The first step is humility.

The Barn’s CRISPY DUCK CONFIT, on the dinner menu, with white bean purèe, tokyo turnips, baby carrots, pomme paillasson.

The Barn’s CRISPY DUCK CONFIT, on the dinner menu, with white bean purèe, tokyo turnips, baby carrots, pomme paillasson.

SEARED DUCK BREAST on a recent Sunday Supper in The Gallery, with citrus risotto, pickled chicory, roasted asparagus, fresh garden herbs.

SEARED DUCK BREAST on a recent Sunday Supper in The Gallery, with citrus risotto, pickled chicory, roasted asparagus, fresh garden herbs.

In the Barn: Bellwether Farm’s Cheesecake with Barndiva Farm pears, preserved and dehydrated. Spring floral arrangement by Daniel Carlson. Image by Eva Perla, a German journalist writing about the history of farm to table in Healdsburg.

In the Barn: Bellwether Farm’s Cheesecake with Barndiva Farm pears, preserved and dehydrated. Spring floral arrangement by Daniel Carlson. Image by Eva Perla, a German journalist writing about the history of farm to table in Healdsburg.

In The Gallery: Fritto Misto with smelts rich in Omega 3, veg and citrus. Not shown, the jolly little bucket of dipping aioli that comes with it.

In The Gallery: Fritto Misto with smelts rich in Omega 3, veg and citrus. Not shown, the jolly little bucket of dipping aioli that comes with it.

Another difference between our two dining rooms: The Gallery is where we hold our private events. Many start with dining in the gardens, dancing inside til the wee hours but in the shoulder months, or on the occasion of inclement weather, we move inside and lose some tables after dinner.

Another difference between our two dining rooms: The Gallery is where we hold our private events. Many start with dining in the gardens, dancing inside til the wee hours but in the shoulder months, or on the occasion of inclement weather, we move inside and lose some tables after dinner.

At the end of the day, great food and intriguing spaces mean nothing if the welcome - the entire experience - is not genuine. The Barndiva family is made up of chefs, managers, front of house, bartenders, and event staff who understand this. Our greatest blessing, beyond living where we do, are the people who have chosen to work here alongside us.

FOH line up with Chefs Danny Girolomo and Randy Dodge

FOH line up with Chefs Danny Girolomo and Randy Dodge

Natalie Nelson, Barndiva events coordinator, with some of her extraordinary team

Natalie Nelson, Barndiva events coordinator, with some of her extraordinary team

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Two Standout Sundays.

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The Pink Party is our favorite fête because of the two communities it brings together: winemakers from Sonoma and Mendocino Counties and a Bay Area tout va bien crowd that comes dressed to celebrate spring, drink superlative wine, and hug it out. Sound frivolous? Yes and no. Yes, as in we could all use a bit of frivolity right about now, and no, as in these are serious wine drinkers eager to meet iconic and rising star winemakers. We time the party just as the wisteria is blooming and the urge to see the end of winter is palpable. Tickets go swiftly, a testament to the fact that almost half the crowd that attends has been before, some since it’s very first year. The usual number of wineries pouring, when phenom somm Alexis Iaconis ran it was 30+. Behold, our extraordinary wine director Chappy Cottrell, who has blown that number up to 41. (see the complete list, below.)

We’ve added some bells and whistles this year, which we are keeping secret until the 14th. They will surprise and delight along with delectable Rosé friendly fare from the kitchens, great music from DJ Jeremy, and a raffle to benefit the important work Healdsburg Corazón is doing- every winery is graciously contributing. We appreciate the importance of strong community in times like these. And the value of throwing a great garden party where you can dress up and laugh among friends, old and new. Who says we can’t multi-task?

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As for celebrating springtime with the family..….

Join us for Easter brunch!

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Spring Encanto

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This Week

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There is serious talent in Barndiva and The Gallery right now. Above: Randy, plating his handrolled Cavatelli in The Gallery; Yazmin, in the Barn, plating a cornucopia of vegetables and salad greens under the watchful eye of Danny; The many colors of Terra. Image of Yazmin by our pastry chef Shae, a fan.

While At the Farm…

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On the mornings it hasn’t rained, clouds as vaporous as dragon’s breath enfold the gardens and orchards at sunrise. Do we know what dragon’s breath looks like? We do not, but there is a magical fairy tale quality to the light up here on these early spring mornings. Below, Queen Anne cherries are the first to bloom this week; “Happy Rich,” variety of sprouting broccoli and shelling peas hides out in the tunnel alongside White Ranunculus beds; vibrant Analita tulips filled with eager Hoberflies.

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Let the Fêtes Begin!

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Stepping Off

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This Week at the Barn

Dan was sipping an insanely colored drink after a long, glorious day spent digging and planting in the gardens. Made with dried hibiscus flowers and heavenly scented lilac honey we infused at the farm last spring, it was a perfect drink for spring; bright and packed with sharp sweet flavors. It was so tasty I’ve asked Isabel to put a rendition of it on the Spring Cocktail List. For those craving a spirited lift, it will be paired with Barr Hill Vodka, made by honeybee loving friends in Vermont. An N/A version, with a hint of Seedlip, will be available as well, as elegant as it’s boozy cousin.

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Our intrepid farm manager is also responsible for the profusion of Barndiva Farm bouquets delighting guests in The Barn and The Gallery. These blowzy arrangements are a visual history of our life up here on Greenwood Ridge. Marisa Moore and Miss Edna Camellias Victoria planted 70 years ago now bloom alongside Double Ruffle Daffodils, Panda Anemones, Apricot Beauty Tulips, and Thalia Daffodils as our collection, which we add to every year, continues.

Next up on the bars and in the windowsills: more Hellebores, flowering Rosemary and cascading wands of Cherry and Apple Blossom branches.

And more cocktails, of course.

Guests who came for lunch last week had to gaze wistfully out at the gardens, which won’t officially open until the Pink Party on April 14. Good thing Danny brought spring to the plate with a gorgeous salmon tartar, studded with pine nuts, bright with curry and citrus, served with lentil papadoms. Truly the ultimate gluten free Omega 3 spring lunch. Burrata is still on the menu, served with grilled Redbird Pain au Levain, great as a starter or to share over cocktails. And hey, if you’d love to sip extraordinary library wines but without committing to a whole bottle, check out Chappy’s three new chalkboards in The Gallery. We are justly proud of our wine director. Stay tuned for exciting wine news next week.

And expect to see new dishes from the kitchens as the season kicks into gear.

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This Week at the Farm

Onion shoots started in the greenhouse made it to their own beds this week, while Bodega Reds, Ark of Taste potatoes gifed from Dan’s dad, were slit and put out in the sun to scar up. Our microgreen program is in full swing and we encourage you to put our servers to the test by asking them to identify what’s hot and what’s long on a buttery sweet finish.

We’re also confident Kendall and Fern can identify all the blooms in our floral arrangements should you inquire. Flowering bulbs swiftly come and go, therein lies their mystery, and magic. Up on the ridge they slumber underground most of the year, drinking up the rains and suffering through long hot summers. We don’t dig them up except to split and redistribute. Come spring they burst forth during those few weeks when the sun warms up for a few hours midday.

One of the great truths in life is that being in nature soothes something in the soul, with the power to make us healthier if not happier human beings. In a world which is overwhelmingly transactional, where social media has made us unabashed attention seekers, Nature is one of the last outliers offering the opportunity to just be, no agenda necessary. You don’t have to climb a mountain or cross a desert wilderness to get the hit I’m referring to. Sonoma and Mendocino Counties are resplendent right now - the perfect time to step off and wander through a garden, field or forest and touch the hem of renewal we all crave after a long winter - and this has been one crazy winter. There is nothing quite like the experience of being in Nature as it replenishes itself. Get out there. It won’t wait for you.

If you must take your phone, load it up with a great plant and bird identification app and just… go.

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Finally, a Break in the Rain

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Just when we thought it would never stop, it did. The rain ceased and the sun burst forth, trees in the orchards dripping water like jewels. We got the tractor going, started a burn in the lower orchards, checked on vegetable beds. Then we just stumbled around, punch drunk, in this green and glistening world.

Across the valley neighbors were emerging like we were, surveying the damage, getting on with the work of spring. Up here on the ridge rivulets on the road had turned into gullies, there was much planting to do, row upon row of apple trees to prune.

But when your cup runneth over, you stop to drink.

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This Week at the Barn and the Farm……

Sweet peas on mulberry coppice, Calypso Orchids and Black Trumpets in the lower forest, Alcosa Cabbage shoots in the beds; a burn. We stand around, warming our hands, watching the unusable bits of last year’s projects go up in smoke, plannng new ones.

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Shae plates Chef Noll’s ethereal coconut milk carrot cake, bursting with dates, nuts and cognac poached raisins. Garnished w/ a carrot gelée, a scoop caramel ice cream and candy glass. Isabel harvests violas for cocktails from the beds behind The Gallery.

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Dan feels out the space where guests will pose before a poloroid floral wall he will build for The Pink Party, now just weeks away. Randy gives the staff a taste of The Gallery’s octopus and ceci bean dish at line up. It goes on the Sunday Supper menu this week. Scotty cools a quiche on the windowsill, offering a thin slice for one hungry photographer.






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Pink Snow and Sunday Suppers

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So there we were busy planning The Pink Party, thinking spring was just around the corner, when it started snowing. This isn’t the first time in living memory we’ve had snow on the ridge, and it’s no indication we will have a milder summer, but boy were we intoxicated with it’s brief beauty. Redwoods and orchards dusted in glittering snow, dense fog drifting off to reveal blue skies. These lovely images were taken by Daniel on Feb 1; it snowed again Feb 9. When you know a landscape so well, know it down to the bone, it’s both exhilarating and disconcerting to wake up one morning and find it transformed. A poem you forgot you wrote. The fragment of a song you know by heart, sung in a different language.

O ye of little faith, here it is: Return of Sunday Supper!

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2.17.19

FARRO POMODORO SOUP, PARMESAN FRICO

OR

JACKSON FAMILY GREENS, APPLE & BURRATA CROSTINI, CELERY & PANCETTA

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PORCINI LASAGNA, PEPPERED RICOTTA, FONDUTA, TOMATO CONSERVA

OR

PORK COLLAR MILANAISE, ESCAROLE, SULTANAS, PINE NUTS, LEMON

~

TIRAMISU

MASCARPONE, ESPRESSO, CHOCOLATE

***

Prix Fixe $39

Wine Pairing $35

Reservations Recommended 707.431.7404

vegetarian entree upon request

THINK PINK 2019

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Tickets for Healdsburg’s unofficial launch to summer, The Pink Party, went on sale last week and they are going fast. Chappy Cottrell, our intrepid Beverage Director and Somm is leading the charge this year, and we are excited to see which winemakers and vintners will be added to the fabulous collective that gathers in both of our gardens on the second Sunday in April. First winemaker invites always go out to the group founded by Alexis, who will be here with husband Matt pouring their Brick & Mortar Rosé, Pét Nat and Sparkling. DJ Jeremy has agreed to come back (with a very personal playlist!), Chef Mark and team will send out (seemingly) endless bites to delight, and yes, there will be a draw for a bounteous collection of wines in support of the vital local charity, Corazón Healdsburg.

If you’ve attended before you know The Pink Party is about more than drinking superlative Rosé - though it is that as well as a beautiful time of the year for friends to meet up and hoot a bit. It’s also a chance to re-assert the belief that Healdsburg’s obsession with wine should not begin and end in the tasting room. An opportunity to come meet the people who make some of our best wines, as they will be there, standing right in front of you. We are thrilled The Pink Party has found a home here at the Barn alongside our other two seasonally inspired larger SommTable wine events, Fête Blanc and Fête Rouge.

FYI: If you read the blog, mention Eat the View when you check in - a small gift of appreciation will be waiting.

Tickets for The Pink Party: CLICK HERE

2018’s ready to rock it Pink Party winemakers.…

2018’s ready to rock it Pink Party winemakers.…

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Onward to 2019

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A few minutes before the last service of 2018 began our entire staff gathered in the Barndiva garden to celebrate having reached the end of another crazy year of hospitality in Healdsburg. We are a lucky bunch, and we know it. Surrounded by an indelible landscape where we are able to source extraordinary food and wine, in a beautiful part of a state that will continue to protect the environment, we feel blessed indeed. But that is only part of it. Our ‘little’ quarter acre in the heart of Healdsburg is an oasis, and we savor it. Early in the mornings, long before guests arrive, when the air is clear and crisp and a lingering scent of chicory from Flying Goat Roastery co-mingles with whatever is baking here in the ovens, the town feels like it did when we first arrived 15 years ago, small and familiar.

Great restaurant teams have this in common, they rise or fall together, constantly juggling the challenges of a balancing act of so many visceral elements.

This year was an especially momentous one as Mark Hopper joined us as executive chef, along with a new director for all our many wine programs, Chappy Cottrell. If the last service of the year was bittersweet, as beloved Drew Wycoff took his leave after nine great years and the dining room’s Paula Morais headed out of Healdsburg with husband Samuele, sadness was tempered by the knowledge that what has kept the Barndiva experience relevant, an ability to take what the family is passionate about and channel it from the farm back into food, wine, cocktails, art and design, is alive and kicking.

Here then is a short album of the last day of the year. When we re-open on the 9th (12th in The Gallery) with Randy Dodge leading The Gallery kitchen, there will be an evolving menu with new dishes. We are taking it one step at a time; Mark is a chef who does nothing in half measures. Sunday Suppers will resume in Feb and showcase more of the Mediterranean classics he loves. Everything we’ve tasted so far is fresh and exciting with much more to come as new farmers and purveyors Mark has worked with in the past join us.

As for those first few hours of 2019, Tory Teasley and his incredible band did not disappoint. They rocked the house with a great set starting a few minutes before midnight - the perfect end to a tumultuous year in Northern California, and let’s face it, around the world. Tory is a beautiful force of nature - at this crossroads we need all the positive energy we can harness if we are going to do more than survive. Our goal is to thrive. And to bring you along with us.

So yeah, It Takes A Village. We love ours.

Come visit in 2019.
Happy New Year

The beautiful Kendall, who along with Fern greeted guests at the Barndiva host stand. All florals throughout the Barn and The Gallery by Barndiva Farm Manager Daniel Carlson.

The beautiful Kendall, who along with Fern greeted guests at the Barndiva host stand. All florals throughout the Barn and The Gallery by Barndiva Farm Manager Daniel Carlson.

Isabel ran a special NYE video in The Gallery where gold wrapped menus featured 74+ champagnes.

Isabel ran a special NYE video in The Gallery where gold wrapped menus featured 74+ champagnes.

In The Gallery kitchen, L to R: Abel, Andrew, Poncho, Tommy, Manuel, CJ, and Randy. Tommy was getting married the next day (but not to Manny…)

In The Gallery kitchen, L to R: Abel, Andrew, Poncho, Tommy, Manuel, CJ, and Randy. Tommy was getting married the next day (but not to Manny…)

Very much in command, Mark in The Barn kitchen, with Jasmin

Very much in command, Mark in The Barn kitchen, with Jasmin

Crab Louis had a Poached Egg Vinaigrette and Golden Russian Osetra from The California Caviar Co. It was served with Pizza Fritta Stuffed with Truffle, Ricotta and BD Farm Chestnut

Crab Louis had a Poached Egg Vinaigrette and Golden Russian Osetra from The California Caviar Co. It was served with Pizza Fritta Stuffed with Truffle, Ricotta and BD Farm Chestnut

Scott and Shae pumped out close to 200 Valrhona Chocolate Mousse w/ Toasted Coconut-Orange Truffles, Chocolate ‘Caviar’ & Brownies

Scott and Shae pumped out close to 200 Valrhona Chocolate Mousse w/ Toasted Coconut-Orange Truffles, Chocolate ‘Caviar’ & Brownies

Paula was everywhere in the Barn

Paula was everywhere in the Barn

The Bar Team: Shane, Isabel, Rojo, Andrew, Terra. Our winter cocktail list will appear when we re-open on Jan 9.

The Bar Team: Shane, Isabel, Rojo, Andrew, Terra. Our winter cocktail list will appear when we re-open on Jan 9.

Wine Director Chappy Cottrell

Wine Director Chappy Cottrell

Andrew

Andrew

Rojo

Rojo

Terra

Terra

Tory singing and dancing . J’adore.

Tory singing and dancing . J’adore.

Teasley is a force of nature with an incredible back up band

Teasley is a force of nature with an incredible back up band

Most of Dan’s forced amaryllis were in full bloom on NYE but these babies are set to open when we do, on Jan. 9

Most of Dan’s forced amaryllis were in full bloom on NYE but these babies are set to open when we do, on Jan. 9

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The Christmas Edition

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The leaves turn yellow, gold, and fall, yet there is a few weeks before the rake or boot when both gardens glow in early winter. The first rain, drifting music from downtown holiday parties. In the early mornings the scent of Scotty baking has a nutmeg and cinnamon edge. With this amped up appetite for an abundance of food and drink comes the ever present desire for joy we all hold within us, somehow easier to access and act upon in the run up to Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

It will be Chef Mark Hopper and Wine Director Chappy Cottrell’s first holiday season with us. They are already having a wonderful effect on our food and wine programs, as you can see for yourself from the photo album of the past week, below. Chappy organized the Billecart-Salmon dinner and he and Lukka have launched our new wine club. Meanwhile, in both kitchens, Chef Hopper is stealthily adding programs and fine tuning everything. All this new creative energy even has the bar team picking up it’s collective head with smashing winter cocktails.

A beginner’s glossary of herbs and wildflowers used medicinally, long before we celebrated Christmas. Many of them decorate the gallery this season.

A beginner’s glossary of herbs and wildflowers used medicinally, long before we celebrated Christmas. Many of them decorate the gallery this season.

Noggin’ is Terra’s elegant take on the Holiday classic.

Noggin’ is Terra’s elegant take on the Holiday classic.

The Christmas we know and love is but a few centuries old, while the floral and herbal scents we associate with the season, like Frankincense and Myrrh, were revered and traded as gold for millennia. The decorated Christmas tree is but a 17th century German invention, and we only began celebrating gift giving on the 25th (or evening of the 24th) during the Victorian era. But long before the birth of Christ this season was celebrated as humans turned to nature for remedy of physical and spiritual need during the long dark months of winter. Primitive small farm communities brought bows of fir and spruce indoors from the time civilization had doors. It’s lively, oily, greenly pungent scent was a visceral and often mind saving reminder that no matter how seemingly endless and gloomy, spring would come. So what must a ‘pagan’ Christmas have smelled like? K2 and I researched through a plethora of early Winter Solstice traditions; Dan foraged farm and forest and all the way down to Cloverdale, and…voila! Our love letter to the season will hang from the rafters until the first of the year. Don’t miss checking out the warm scents of Frankincense, Myrrh and ‘Gold,’ in the Somm’s Table trace boxes.

Holiday food and drink:

The Billecart-Salmon Dinner

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A generous tasting of Golden Russian Osetra, Siberian Sturgeon and Queen’s Reserve White Sturgeon, all from the  California Caviar Company . Served with Einkorn and Banana Bellinis, Latkes, Pizza Fritta, Avocado and Sour Cream. Paired with   Billecart-Salmon Blanc de Blanc Brut en Magnum .

A generous tasting of Golden Russian Osetra, Siberian Sturgeon and Queen’s Reserve White Sturgeon, all from the California Caviar Company. Served with Einkorn and Banana Bellinis, Latkes, Pizza Fritta, Avocado and Sour Cream. Paired with Billecart-Salmon Blanc de Blanc Brut en Magnum.

Truffle d’Alba …

Truffle d’Alba …

…Tagliatelle with Butter Parmesan, served with   Cuvée Nicholas François Brut 2002 en Magnum

…Tagliatelle with Butter Parmesan, served with Cuvée Nicholas François Brut 2002 en Magnum

A prelude to NYE, the gallery set for the Billecart-Salmon dinner.

A prelude to NYE, the gallery set for the Billecart-Salmon dinner.

Warm Vichyssoise w/ Cavier Crème Fraîche along with   Brut Sous Bois NV

Warm Vichyssoise w/ Cavier Crème Fraîche along with Brut Sous Bois NV

The evening featured   Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé, Blanc de Blancs, Brut Sous Bois, ‘02 Cuvée Nicholas François, ‘99 Clos Saint-Hilaire, ‘07 Extra Brut, Demi Sec

The evening featured Billecart-Salmon Brut Rosé, Blanc de Blancs, Brut Sous Bois, ‘02 Cuvée Nicholas François, ‘99 Clos Saint-Hilaire, ‘07 Extra Brut, Demi Sec

It’s de rigueur to have fried chicken somewhere in a serious champagne dinner. Our own gallery bistro Poulet Frite was served on a warm puddle of Polenta with Honey Butter and a ‘bouquet’ of burnished Gold Tree Mushroom. Sublime with   2002 Cuvée Nicholas François.

It’s de rigueur to have fried chicken somewhere in a serious champagne dinner. Our own gallery bistro Poulet Frite was served on a warm puddle of Polenta with Honey Butter and a ‘bouquet’ of burnished Gold Tree Mushroom. Sublime with 2002 Cuvée Nicholas François.

Cheese Course: Chaource, Bûchette, Langres with toasted Brioche and BD Farm Apple Marmalade, with   2007 Extra Brut

Cheese Course: Chaource, Bûchette, Langres with toasted Brioche and BD Farm Apple Marmalade, with 2007 Extra Brut

Scott Noll’s ‘Mignardise’ of Brown Butter Financier, Valrhona Brownie, Coconut Macaroon with   Demi Sec

Scott Noll’s ‘Mignardise’ of Brown Butter Financier, Valrhona Brownie, Coconut Macaroon with Demi Sec

 Holiday Libations from Rojo, Terra, Andrew and Isabel

Winter Pimm’s

Winter Pimm’s

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The Deer Prom (aka The Good Dirty)

The Deer Prom (aka The Good Dirty)

The Hound

The Hound

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Cheers!

Food, drink, parties, & the wine club are all redeemable with a Barndiva gift certificate.

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Hello Stranger

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I’m of a mind that the best moments of any voyage are serendipitous, often costing little or nothing if you are ready to receive them. So when I managed to huff and puff my way to the top of the Bruton Dovecote in Somerset and came face to face with a small grazing herd of the most splendid dairy cows on this green earth, I stopped and plopped down. We were on the way to Hauser & Wirth to see Piet Oudolf’s gardens in their late autumn splendor after a gratifying lunch At the Chapel. I was full up. All I wanted to do was sit.

Cows are thought to be dumb, insensate creatures, but that is not my experience of them. One in particular took an interest, and in the ensuing, doleful yet intense staring contest, she clearly asked the most pertinent question of the day, and in fact the journey : what are you doing here?

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This is the question it’s wise to start with every day when you travel, but one you rarely hear from the people you are interacting with - purveyors of hospitality - whose job it is to please, not to challenge. Just through the romantic veil of travel you can glimpse the financial exchange that’s going on, alongside the cultural one. You want adventure, great food, lots of drink, a room with a view! They want you to support them, will thank you for your temporary adoration as you’re heading out the door, see you again, bye! In London over a noisy dinner when I could not stop going on about the trees! The trees in England! My friend asked “you live in a forest…but you come here to see…trees?” Yes, in fact I do, they have trees to beat the band in England, but also, mostly, to try and see the forest for the trees, which is not always possible when you are well stuck in, juggling day to day, just trying to keep all the balls in the air. Back of House, Front of House, purveyors, managing the farm. When a guest finally goes out the door at the end of a long day it would be wonderful not to worry about the popularity contest social media has become and just trust you’ve had a delicious, worthwhile exchange with them.

The impetus behind publishing these personal images, places where we did have meaningful experiences, is to celebrate them in hopes you will seek them out. Hats tipped for the talent and dedication that make them work. And to leave you with this thought: while it often costs a great deal of money to create restaurants and hotels which are both sustainable and stunningly beautiful, it may not be inevitable that the joys of great food, drink and hospitality will be increasingly unaffordable to many, even given the economic disparity that’s growing in almost every sector of our country. Not if we support any enterprise that’s advancing the change we hope to see in the way animals are reared and crops are produced. Not if we really care where our food comes from.

FOOD

We aim to Eat the View everywhere when we travel, and boy did we feast in England. In terms of creative, divine madness, where the talent was still at the stove (increasingly rare) the meal we had at David Toutain in Paris exceeded anything else we have eaten this year, but the food that inspired us the most was directly connected to a ‘view,’ i.e. the beautiful thriving gardens directly outside the windows where we dined. The Ethicurean, in the Barley Wood Walled Gardens of Wrington, and the two meals (and breakfast) we enjoyed at The Wild Rabbit, in Morton-on-Marsh, topped an estimable list. These two experiences span the distance between what sweat equity and fabulous fortune (which can afford the sweat of others) may engender, but both deliver and delight in meaningful ways, confirming that when your goal is a commitment to Farm to Table you can accomplish remarkable things that can affect people’s lives.

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Ethicurean could do no wrong, they had us at hello. I urge anyone traveling to this little corner of the world just outside Bristol to dine, leaving a few hours to wander through the extraordinary walled gardens. The history is fascinating: four friends who took over a dilapidated, centuries old garden estate and brought it back to life and into the heart of their rural community. Some of the vines and trees in the orchards were planted in 1901, the year Queen Victoria took her final breath; all of it is vibrating with health today, reflected in the simply delicious food they serve. Can’t visit? Ethicurean has published a brilliant cookbook you can order online.

The Wild Rabbit in the heart of the Cotswolds manages to be a ‘local’ pub and a lovely fine dining restaurant, with thoughtfully designed rooms up a narrow winding stair. That a 20 minute walk down a (usually) muddy lane takes you through Daylesford Farm, a wonderland of gorgeous grazing fields and impressive greenhouses, would have been enough. That at the end of your walk you find a stunning Eataly style two story mega food emporium featuring vegetables, cheese, dairy, bread, flowers, all produced in the surrounding farmlands, owned by a single family, sold by an engaging informed staff, is beyond impressive. It is the jewel in the crown of the Daylesford brand which has been producing and delivering farm to shop food products across select London businesses for two decades. Several classes could be seen through the glass walls of the cheese room, the large cafe had been buzzing with punters of all ages, and several private parties were in full swing. This may not your local super, admittedly this is a posh part of the English countryside, but it’s a commendable achievement that does not skirt the fact that the price of great food, especially proteins ethically raised and produced, is expensive. If we learn to eat less at the top of the food chain, live seasonally, shop for the locally produced, and for god’s sake learn to cook, we may see that price inch down.

GARDENS

Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat'Saisons , Great Milton, Oxford.

Belmond Le Manoir aux Quat'Saisons, Great Milton, Oxford.

Both Belmond Manoir aux Quat’Saison, with it’s beautifully productive gardens studded with sculpture, glass and neoprene greenhouses, and the Pig Hotel near Bath, which like the other Pig Hotels spread across the most bucolic parts of England have remarkable edible gardens, base their menus on what comes from their view. In the Pig’s case the rule of thumb is that everything served which they cannot grow is sourced from sustainable purveyors within a 25 mile radius of each hotel. While we thoroughly enjoyed our time with James Nobel, farm manager at the newly opened Heckfield Place, it’s impossible to tell what their ambitious but nascent on site food programs of new orchards, multiple greenhouses, chickens, pigs, and sheep, will develop into over the next few years. It takes more than money to produce food the quality Ethicurean, Wild Rabbit and The Pigs. Dedication and education of a work force, engendering their love for what they are doing, is essential. Beyond that, but rarely found, is a connection to the politics of the greater food community even if unbeknownst to the guest. Which is why At The Chapel won our hearts. They manage, with impressive alacrity, to combine great food and challenging social forums. Follow their newsletter, better yet stay there if you travel to Bruton. The food is great, you are a few minutes away from Hauser & Wirth and Piet Oudolf’s Garden, and with any luck you can make a detour and spend time with the cows on the Bruton Dovecote.

The ‘five seasons’ gardens of Piet Oudolf at Hauser & Wirth, Somerset, (above) are only a 20 minute ride from At the Chapel, in Bruton and the Pig Hotel, Bath.

DRINK

In the bar at The Pig Hotel, Bath

In the bar at The Pig Hotel, Bath

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Barndiva is branching out from Apple Juice, Vinegar and Balsamic: we now have 50 gallons in copper stills that with the help from our friend Tara Jasper of Sipsong Spirits we hope to make our first ever apple brandy. Tasting the best of what Somerset and Devon had to offer with respect to anything apple was high on our list this fall. The Pig Hotels, which all have exemplary bar programs, did not disappoint. This was our first stay at their hotel near Bath (the Pig at Comb is a perennial favorite) and their engaging bar staff there, with Max at the ready, took us through all the local ciders, introduced us to the rising Non-Alcoholic Seedlip brand (which we hope to serve soon at Barndiva) and introduced us to the most extraordinary apple aperitif - Kingston Black - a Somerset Cider Brandy. Roaring fire, hundreds of white deer crossing the fields outside the windows, dusk falling over the gardens made for two memorable evenings. Dinner was a whole roasted chicken sourced just from down the road, a load of fries, a garden salad and a surprisingly great Pinot from Wairarapa, New Zealand.

Most of the wines we drank throughout the trip were French, as it turns out. At BRAT, a fish restaurant in London, they have a constantly changing Coravin program; at Lyles, also in London, it’s Pet Nat and other ‘raw’ unfiltered finds which may not be to every taste but challenge our notion of what we should be pairing. The best Somms listen before steering you in any direction. Chappie Cottrell, who has taken over Barndiva’s wine program, thankfully shares this skill. Stay tuned for lots more about Chappie in the coming months.

ART

Richard Long’s “Madrid Line North, 1985” in the lawn of  Hauser & Wirth’s Durslade Farm, Somerset.

Richard Long’s “Madrid Line North, 1985” in the lawn of Hauser & Wirth’s Durslade Farm, Somerset.

Jean-Michel Basquiat and Egon Schiele powerhouse double exhibit at the  Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris . Two angry men, with surprisingly at lot in common. Extremely relevant.

Jean-Michel Basquiat and Egon Schiele powerhouse double exhibit at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris. Two angry men, with surprisingly at lot in common. Extremely relevant.

The adjustment upon re-entry from any trip can be (usually is) temporary - a mild re-direction in attitude from being reminded it’s a big world out there, which you are certainly not the center of. But it can also be large and resonate- encouraging you to rediscover an appetite for incorporating life with work in the ways they interact, support each other. Enjoy all those travel Instagram accounts, I know I do. At the airport I picked up Cereal, a life style travel and design magazine published in England by one Rosa Park whom, as chance would have it, I have been following on Instagram...wish fulfillment on a beautiful level. Just remember to put down your recording device before you pick it up again. Travel alone cannot change anything about the way you see the world unless you immerse yourself in the culture with an open mind, and crucially, an open heart.

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First Crush

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Apples are pretty much on our minds all year long. Winter to spring we are grafting, pruning, planting and nurturing (20 new baby trees this year alone) then we hit early summer and thinning followed by staking begins. Finally, mid-September, we’re faced with the decision of what to pick first, and the challenge begins to find able bodies to help harvest over the next month, as our dry farmed heirloom varieties all ripen differently. The labor crunch in Anderson Valley only gets worse every year, as vineyards proliferate.

Apples are an exhausting, perplexing, challenging piece of our farming life. We get cider and syrup, juice and vinegar out of the trees, for which we are justly proud. We get to tell the history of this ridge, honoring the commitment we made to it three decades ago, and to participate in the County Fair, which allows us to cross paths with a community we admire. But the sweetest moment in any year of farming apples isn’t looking over a barn filled with product, as laudable as that is - it’s a moment that comes and goes quickly, but with a promise that always delivers: when we finally lift a glass and have that first drink straight from the apple press. How to describe it? It’s apple skins that taste of hot sun and baked earth mingling with juicy flesh that has bathed in the gentle fogs that roll over the ridges every evening from the ocean, enfolding the trees, often lingering on through morning. It’s fragrant apple mist, with honeyed top notes followed by a whisper of dried cinnamon and chaparral. There is a barest hint of something green in the finish, not herbal but close. Wild mint maybe. Spruce tips. That first sip is the moment you think, holy shit, drink the view, yes.

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To that moment we get the added joy of sharing that first draught just down the road at The Philo Apple Farm. We’ve been honored to raise our families, crops and more than one glass of g&t with Karen and Tim Bates for over the years; seeing their lovely daughter Rita and our son, Lukka, and their respective partners, Jerzy and Dan, working together at crush gives rise to one of those rare moments when the words ‘family’ and ‘farm’ still glow with promise. These are supremely talented kids that could be off doing something else - yet here they are, bonhomie personified, making juice on a glorious sunny day, air redolent with cooking apples. It isn’t something to take for granted.

If you don’t already know about the Philo Apple Farm, which sits on the Navarro River just across from Hendy Woods, you should. Hanging out there is a truly exquisite experience, all the more so for not being full of itself. This is a hard working apple farm with greenhouses, fields of vegetables and flowers, an old fashioned packing shed, a cooking kitchen for classes and private dinners, five charming cottages, and acres of orchard walks leading down to the river or into the redwoods.

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To the familial cast of characters at first crush (there will be at least two more) were several good spirited interns that kept the apples bouncing through the grinder and up to the ladies on the platform, in full yellow aprons and white boots, who gently wrapped layer after layer of pulp into apple soaked linens used to line the press trays. Only Rita really knew where everything was flowing, good thing the kid has a mind like a steel trap. This is a decidedly old fashioned way of pressing apples, outdoors on an old crusher and even older press, with fall leaves and lots of good bacteria floating around. In an increasingly technological world that is compartmentalized and insulated from nature, first crush is a step back to a time when experience was visceral, memory relied on bites not bytes, and fellowship mattered.

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Next Wednesday and Thursday, for as long as it lasts, we will have fresh pressed Barndiva Farm apple juice to share with our guests and neighbors in Healdsburg, a tradition we love to keep going this time of year, so come on by. Once Chef Mark is settled in and working alongside Andrew and Scotty, we will, no doubt, have more to share from this year’s harvest.

Cheer!

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Outstanding, indeed!

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Even if you throw huge dinner parties for a living, as we do, it’s not every day you see a single table set for 220 people. On the top of a remote mountain surrounded by vineyards. But Jim Denevan, founder of Outstanding in the Field, does this for a living, traveling to remote, always stunning locations across America (and now Europe), outsourcing food and spirits to one night only partners. They rarely, if ever, visit the same location twice, or work with the same chefs and vintners.

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We’ve always wanted to do an Outstanding event, and thanks to our good friends at Flowers Vineyards & Winery, we were afforded this opportunity on June 23. Outstanding handles all the logistics, from choosing the location to picking up the last dessert spoon, but the task of pulling off a remarkable, locally sourced menu that does justice to these truly outstanding locations falls to culinary talent working without a net, with no refrigeration and only the most basic cooking implements (think fire).

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Camp Meeting Ridge Vineyards, where Flowers Vineyard & Winery is located, is on the Extreme Sonoma Coast on the top of a rolling mountainous range two miles above the Pacific. When an unexpected heat wave made their original choice of location, which Flowers had spent weeks grooming, untenable, they took it in stride, relocating a 300' long, single sinuous table to a graceful setting under an oak tree grove whose boughs dipped and dived over the heads of bemused, but now happily shaded diners. Earlier in the day, when the Barndiva team arrived at Camp Meeting Ridge (elevation 1150') in a refrigerated truck, Ryan, Andrew, Jordy, Lukka and Cathryn were met by a dozen or more OITF staff beneath two spacious tents, adjacent to four long charcoal grills. As the evening progressed it increasingly felt like the last night extravaganza of a foodie summer camp. If the group had broken out in song midway through the four hour dinner service (more Celebrate than Kumbaya) no one would have been surprised. It's obvious that for OITF pulling off a great event every time has to be, first and foremost, chill for all the participants. While that starts and ends with the guest list, it happily includes chefs and vintners who cannot help but be inspired by the hip professionalism of OITF's  team of expediters and servers. 

In honor of that spirit, here then is an album of the evening as viewed from BOH. From the oohs and ahhs reported by the servers who scaled dark hillocks loaded with groaning platters, I'm happy to report the food was a success; for anyone fascinated with the speed and timing and smallest details of food production,  the real action was down in the tents, redolent with grilled duck smoke, sounds of laughter, the pulling of numerous corks, low recitations of the ingredients and purveyors of each dish headed up to diners. 

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First Up: As the OITF bus ferried diners to the tasting room lawn,  Flowers poured copious amounts of their Rosé, while Barndiva began the evening with a modern take on a precolonial cocktail, Fleurette @ Flowers, a collaboration with New Alchemy Distilling. Canapés consisted of lemon verbena infused watermelon cubes, Dungeness crab tostadas, deep fried goat cheese croquettes sprinkled with lavender flowers and honey, and Scotty Noll's caviar crème fraîche black pepper panna cotta cups . 

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Fleurette @ Flowers featured New Alchemy's Arborist gin, pink grapefruit juice, BD Farms rosemary honey, In Pursuit of Tea's Jasmine Pearls, and clarified whole milk. It was finished with Fleurette gin and garnished with bachelor buttons from the Barndiva gardens. 

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1st Course was huge loaves of toasted levain from Red Bird Bakery, Preston olives, pickled Barndiva Farms onions, Rancho Gordo white bean hummus and roasted garlic bulbs.

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Following a 2nd course of Bernier Farms baby gem lettuce Caesar (plated in the refrigerated truck), the 3rd course was grilled "ratatouille," with rosemary brushed romesco sauce, green and gold squash, roasted tomatoes, garlic sherry vinaigrette, vibrant basil pistou and Pennyroyal Farm's delicious Laychee sheep and goat milk cheese (milked and made in Boonville, the heart of the Anderson Valley. Laychee is Boontling for milk.)

Rosemary basting 'brushes' soaked in Bernier Farms garlic butter

Rosemary basting 'brushes' soaked in Bernier Farms garlic butter

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4th course was Liberty Farms grilled duck breast and legs, served on a mount of stone ground polenta, finished with Barndiva pickled ramp bulbs, fresh chives and a glistening stream of roasted Flowers Pinot Noir duck jus. Grilled halibut and vegetarian entrées were also provided.

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All hands were on deck for the dessert course of Russian River Farms macerated strawberries, Scott Noll's brown butter financier cake, cream quenelles, and a light sprinkling of lavender, lemon zest, bachelor buttons and black pepper. 

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A big shout out to the OITF staff, especially ace expediter Matt. To Chantal and all the folks at Flowers Vineyard & Winery, you rock it, especially Jake Whiteley (and I’m not just talking wine). To Ryan and Andrew, for the planning, organization, prep, cooking and presentation, wow, what a meal, accomplished with the same finesse you manage in the Barn and the Bistro. Caps off to Jordy, in charge of the fires, who remained extremely cool under Chef's steely glare while managing to keep four enormous charcoal grills to an exact temp before the “fire duck now!” order went down.

Lukka had the most arduous and greasy jobs of the event: driving the precariously loaded truck from Healdsburg up the 18% Meyers Grade without spilling the jus, then jumping into the heart of the smoke when Jordy and Andrew just could not handle the number of duck breasts and legs that had to hit the heat at the same time. Our restaurant manager Cathryn was everywhere, as she is here at the Barn: mordantly funny but a dead calm participant. Last but certainly not least, a huge thank you to New Alchemy Distilling's Jason and Chandra Somerby. When OITF asked us to provide a celebratory libation to start the evening we wasted no time roping them in to help. They not only devised the kick ass cocktail (a two day process to clarify the milk tea infusion until it was crystal clear, thank you Isabel!), they somehow managed to serve it chilled without breaking a sweat.

Chef Andrew Wycoff, owner Lukka Feldman, restaurant manager Cathryn Hulsman, artist Jordy Morgan, aka HOBO grill master extraordinaire

Chef Andrew Wycoff, owner Lukka Feldman, restaurant manager Cathryn Hulsman, artist Jordy Morgan, aka HOBO grill master extraordinaire

While I have only been a watcher to the entire process (not counting a 6am bachelor button harvest for the cocktail garnish), the OITF event with Flowers has been an unmitigated delight. There are so many complicated pieces to serving great food to large groups and family-style is not our usual approach, but oh how we love its abundance, and the joy of watching everyone dig in. While the beauty of each course did not suffer for the speed at which the platters needed to be assembled, the flavors sang a beautiful song of summer in this time and place.

We were all pretty exhausted by the time it was growing dark and we hauled out huge containers of macerated strawberries for a financier shortcake, but it presented a final perfectly syncronated moment for the Barndiva team: Andrew forming perfect vanilla whip cream quenelles, Jordy sprinkling lavender flowers, Ryan grinding black pepper, Cathryn grating lemon zest (lightly, no rind!), Lukka sprinkling blue cornflowers. It did not matter we were on top of a mountain, what I saw in their teamwork was analogous to what we do everyday here at the Barn. Great food is the product of great producers and chefs who are inspired and, yes, obsessive to every detail - wherever that food is served. The Outstanding in the Field event with Flowers on June 23rd was an Eat the View moment to remember. 

Wish you were there.

Chef Ryan takes a bow; gives thanks to purveyors, participants and of course our guests

Chef Ryan takes a bow; gives thanks to purveyors, participants and of course our guests

 

 

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Our Vase Runneth Over.....

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Our floral program has been an essential component of The Barndiva Dining Experience for the past 16 years, but since Daniel Carlson moved to the farm and began guiding it two years ago it's taken a leap forward, nudging into the sublime. It isn't just his energy and passion, which extends to what we grow for our food program, Dan has a naturalist's understanding of what works together and what doesn't. I've seen him build arrangements of such elegant simplicity they fill the dining room with the same lambent joy we feel when we happen upon flowers growing in a garden. It's color, it's form, it's a talent to combine an affinity of elements, sure, but the heart of any truly beautiful floral arrangement is how it connects you back to nature. A connection, I believe, we are missing all the time, on some level.

Besides filling the Barn and the Bistro with blooms, Dan works with many of our wedding clients, but it's a little known fact that he is more than happy to create an arrangement for any special occasion. Last Wednesday morning (below) I managed to crawl out of bed to pick with him; it was a thrill to see what he created, later in the day, on the Barndiva and Bistro bars, in the bathrooms, and decorating the windowsills as diners munched away and raised their glasses. For every gardening enthusiast who swoon and ask our hosts the names of our blooms (Kendall and Fern keep a running list) most of our guests seem oblivious to the gardens in glass surrounding them. Which is fine. The best flower arrangements don't stop your progress through a beautiful space, they fragrantly lift you up in anticipation as you continue on your journey. Join Dan's  growing fan club. Follow him @daniel.james.co or check out his new website:  www.danieljamesdesign.co

Truly, our vase runneth over.

 

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Birthday Bouquet

Birthday Bouquet

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A Daniel James garden bar arrangement for a Barndiva Wedding

A Daniel James garden bar arrangement for a Barndiva Wedding

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Why This Spring...

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To not swoon into the glories of a Spring like this one you must be nursing massive allergies to the natural world, or are one hell of a curmudgeon. Either is pretty tragic, for there is manifest joy incubating in the Sonoma and Mendocino air right now, a green and fragrant world, alive and seemingly oblivious to all our human missteps. Up on the ridge, while we could always use more rain, our dry farmed orchards got a nice long drink and, for the moment at least, the redwoods can breathe a sigh of relief. 

We are in the magical week (or two) after the cherries and pears have bloomed and the apples begin to bud, open, set fruit. Singular flowering wands on newly grafted trees as small as children, play hide 'n seek behind old timers planted last century by the Cassanelli's, their hollow trunks still producing surprising profusions of blossoms that twist and wrap around gnarled branches. Meanwhile, fields and forests surrounding the old homestead orchards go on about their glorious business guilelessly, with luxurious carpets of Ixia, Blue Dicks, California Poppies, Buttercups, Blue Eyed Grass, and borders of deep blue Ceanothus. The wildflowers will all be gone soon, part of their charm perhaps, but in this moment they bloom in tandem with the trees and our formal gardens, just starting to awaken for their 7 month run. Smoke Bush, Jasmine, Dutch and Bearded Iris, overwintered Snapdragons, Columbines, Mexican Mock Orange, Mock Orange (such a difference! Dan would say) Iilacs, Foxgloves, Snowballs, and Roses Roses Roses. Lady Banks climbs the dock at the pond, Cecil Bruner covers the outhouse, while all along the path to the great lawn old David Austins open and divinely dive into efflorescence.  

As we fumble towards a future filled with so much uncertainty, it's important to stop and take measure, to anoint ourselves with a season like this Spring. The responsibilities attendant with keeping our beautiful little corner of the world humming can be as simple as paying attention, supporting the people who are working at things that make a difference. Or it can be a bit more complicated, but in a good way, like getting out there and making a difference. But respect should be paid, and we are most humbly paying it.

Attention now shifts to production for Barndiva: propagating, timing when to plant out, pest control, checking off Ryan's list of new varieties we as yet have no idea will thrive up here as much as we do. These images were all shot at sunset one day last week. Normally fog creeps over the ridges that ride in from the Pacific after the sun has set, but a magical backlit foggy light began drifting in as Lukka was making dinner. Dan and I shouted "Takacs Light!" in unison (Claire Takacs is a garden photographer we both admire, who claims to only shoot at dawn and dusk) and dashed out to glory in the incandescence. There is a line in the Mary Oliver poem The Moth I always return to (the poem and this line) "If you notice anything, it leads you to notice more and more." So get out there and fill your eyes to the brim with the beauty of green and flowering life beginning again. It's going to be a long Summer.

 

Dan with some of our new beds: butter lettuce, radicchio, fennel, baby kale, carrots, pea shoots, onions

Dan with some of our new beds: butter lettuce, radicchio, fennel, baby kale, carrots, pea shoots, onions

Vates kale

Vates kale

fava flowers for our spring salad

fava flowers for our spring salad

Fiero radicchio

Fiero radicchio

newly planted cosmos, ageratum, snaps; edible flower beds

newly planted cosmos, ageratum, snaps; edible flower beds

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Favas, Garlic, self seeded Nigella, Fuji apples 

Favas, Garlic, self seeded Nigella, Fuji apples 

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Think Pink

The Pink Party rides again!

The Pink Party rides again!

Yes, it's not yet May and Healdsburg can already feel as crowded as Summer while round-about construction and lack of downtown parking (still) sucks, but damn. For bonhomie and style, not to mention a refreshingly up close and personal interaction with a merry and talented band of winemakers and vintners, the Pink Party rocks it. What makes our Northern California wine shed truly great isn't how many grapes we grow, but the personal stories and passions behind the wines we produce. It's something you just can't read off a label. And it was on full display this past Sunday. 

This is why we love the Pink Party: with the first hint of Spring, along with wildflowers and roses comes bud-break and a fresh desire to make wine tasting relevant to a 'local' crowd. The loose knit group who come together here in our gardens re-affirms that to love wine is to celebrate where and how it's grown. 

We have two more collaborative Wine Events in the same spirit as The Pink Party, both before harvest: Fête Blanc and Fête Rouge. Secure tickets before they too sell out! Barndiva also has two upcoming Sommtable spotlight series dinners early Summer, with Flowers Vineyards & Winery and Peay Vineyards. And, starting in May, every Wednesday we will host a different 'local' vintner we admire in the Gallery Gardens. How do we define local? Susie Selby is down the block from Barndiva. Alison Story and Eric Smith are down the road from Barndiva Farm. Barndiva is stretching its wine wings in new ways to connect our lives with what we continue to love about this community. For information on all upcoming wine related events check out barndiva.com/wine or sign up for Eat the View, our blog.

 Apologies to anyone we missed in this Pink Party 'who poured' album, and mea culpa to the two vintners left out of the group shot!  No worries identifying who is who if you didn't meet them: A complete list of vintners and wineries is listed below. 

A great big shout out to all our chefs - especially Andrew, Thomas, Deron and the gang in the Gallery kitchen. There was killer food and plenty of it (ok you had to be quick when those platters hit the orchard table). To DJ Jeremy and the beautiful Janine, and to Daniel Carlson for the incredible blooms - all from Barndiva Farm, we love you! And a special tip of the chapeau to our awesome wine director Alexis Iaconis who, along with Chef Ryan, Lukka, dear Natalie and Cathryn, pulled off another great annual Spring party. To all the beautiful ladies and gents who dressed in pink, thank you! 

Our raffle tickets this year were sold in support of  Farm to Pantry.  Heartfelt thanks to our friend Chris Paul from Copain, who kindly helped Alexis organize and sell the lots- three full cases of Rosé from generous wineries who attended the event. We were able to raise $1,800 for this very worthy organization. A community, like a country, is only as strong as it's weakest links. 

Our raffle tickets this year were sold in support of Farm to Pantry. Heartfelt thanks to our friend Chris Paul from Copain, who kindly helped Alexis organize and sell the lots- three full cases of Rosé from generous wineries who attended the event. We were able to raise $1,800 for this very worthy organization. A community, like a country, is only as strong as it's weakest links. 

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Divas Rising

The beauty of the "Extreme Sonoma Coast" overlooking Flowers Seaview Vineyards

The beauty of the "Extreme Sonoma Coast" overlooking Flowers Seaview Vineyards

Our definition of a diva is someone who strives to 'hit the high notes', who perfects their art, or indeed their craft, not giving up until they’ve nailed it.  At Barndiva’s opening 14 years ago our divas baked bread (Lou Preston), made exquisite vinegar (Karen Bates), award winning chocolate (John Scharffenberger and Michael Recchiuti) and handcrafted charcuterie (Paul Bertoli, pre-fra’ mani). 

It is hard to imagine, five decades ago, what Merry Edwards faced as a woman trying to gain entrance into the ego driven, wholly male dominated wine industry. Yet against great odds and challenges anyone but Merry would have called setbacks, she has lived a life filled with high notes, balancing soil and weather as if analogous to life and craft.

The inimitable Merry Edwards

The inimitable Merry Edwards

In the course of her remarkable journey she steered an entire industry away from the dangers of lead capsules, and did pioneering work with clones that unarguably changed the history of California wine making. She won a James Beard award and was inducted into the Culinary Institute’s Vintners Hall of Fame. From early acclaim producing Pinot Noir for Mount Eden and Sauvignon Blancs for Matanzas Creek, hers is a passion for choosing small sites where the right rootstock, clone and farming techniques might produce exceptional grapes. It’s a lifelong curiosity about soil that extends to farming, food and flowers.

Merry didn’t do it alone, of course. And she is the first to acknowledge the importance of having great teachers who have your back. In her career this included Dr. Maynard Amerine, Dr. Harold Olmo, and Joe Swan; she and husband Ken Coopersmith have worked as a team for two decades making exceptional estate wines at Meredith and Coopersmith Vineyards, and most recently from their new home and vineyards in Sebastopol, planted with Merry’s Clone, UCD 37.

The two other woman winemakers in our spring SommTable Spotlight Series, though still early in their careers, share in their own way the diva drive and focus. Both work within strong namesake and family partnerships - Chantal Forthun with Walt and Joan Flowers, Vanessa Wong with Nick and Andy Peay. Both have something else in common - making wine with fruit grown in one of the most thrilling but risky regions of the world - the "Extreme Sonoma Coast."

Chantal Forthun

Chantal Forthun

Flowers Vineyard

Flowers Vineyard

When Walt and Joan Flowers purchased 321 acres of ridge top land only 2 miles from the Pacific in 1991 and planted grapes, they were the definition of outliers. Their belief was that the dramatic variables in weather in this rugged coastline, if farmed the right way, could be harnessed to produce uniquely remarkable cool climate varietals. If the idea seemed crazy at the time, they soon put paid to naysayers.

Chantal arrived in 2012, two years into the Flowers' adoption of organic farming practices and native fermentation for 100% of their winemaking. Born and raised in the Central Valley, she had studied botany at Chico State and become an enologist before moving, fortuitously as it turned out, to Bonny Doon in 2008. A mentorship with Randall Grahm impressed upon her the importance of biodynamic farming, winemaking using native yeast, the practice of gravity flow. It was working as an associate winemaker with Randall that Chantal adopted his mantra, which she defines as "a dedication to transparency in an industry filled with smoke and mirrors." In 2011 she returned to the Santa Cruz mountains to make wine for acclaimed Pinot producer Rhys Vineyards, which brought two great loves into her life: the man who would become her husband, and small batch Pinot Noirs made in the Burgundian style. 

Chantal produces Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from the two organic, bio-dynamically farmed Flowers estates - Camp Meeting Ridge Vineyard and Sea View Ridge Vineyard. Great care is given to every stage of winemaking, starting with hand harvesting grapes in the early morning. Pinot grapes have long cold soaks before wild yeast fermentation, the better to showcase the terroir; they are left in contact with the skins, which brings out resplendent color and flavor. Chardonnay grapes go directly to the press and are allowed to settle before going into French Oak barrels for 100% barrel fermentation. Every step Chantal takes strives to enhance the breezy, foggy and intermittently hot coastal climate.

Andy, Vanessa, and Nick

Andy, Vanessa, and Nick

Peay Vineyards

Peay Vineyards

Vanessa Wong has been working her mountain top vineyards since 2001, five years after the grapes were planted by brothers Andy and Nick Peay, who had scraped together the money and purchased and planted these remote vineyards in 1996. A Davis alum, Vanessa worked in California at Peter Michael Winery and Hirsch Vineyard, spending crucial years in France at Château Lafite-Rothschild in Pauillac, Domaine Jean Gros in Vosne-romanée, with course studies at  l’Institut d’Œnologie in Bordeaux. One of those people who know what they want to do from an early age - Vanessa has worked with wine and food since she was 14 - the blogs she writes from her aerie above the Pacific are full of wine musings and great meals with this incredibly close winemaking family (Vanessa is married to Nick Peay, who manages the vineyards, while brother Andy is Peay's conduit to the world.)

Vanessa's practices are minimally manipulative following the belief that when great care is given to soil health and drainage, mindful cultivation that results in low yields will produce the rich, concentrated flavors she is after. Working with ancient maritime soils and sea-bed fossils she uses Peay’s slow growing season to produce vintages, especially their Scallop Shelf Pinots, which have remarkable depth, justly lauded as “judicious and elegant.”

Both Chantal and Vanessa, though distinctly different winemakers, capitalize on the cool weather of their unique locations for a slower ripening season, which allows for delicate aromatics in the skin. Both young women, dedicated to sustainable farming practices, craft earth-driven wines of elegance and complexity.

But more to the heart of what motivates our wonderful Spring Spotlight Series of remarkable women, as Merry Edwards discovered many years ago facing manmade boundaries she longed to cross, when you know what you love and work very hard to become good at it, no borders can stop you from the promised land.  

Meredith Estate: Merry Edwards Winery

Meredith Estate: Merry Edwards Winery

We are honored to have all three of these powerhouse women winemakers join us at The Somm’s Table this Spring and early Summer. Merry Edwards on Friday, March 2; Chantal Forthun on May 25; Vanessa Wong with Nick and Andy Peay on June 15.

Ryan cannot wait to cook for them, and Alexis will join us to host.

The stories continue, the wine will flow.

Click Here to Reserve Your Spot at the Table

 

 

 

 

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Ending the Year in Style

Cold smoked sturgeon, chive tater tot, caviar, chervil

Cold smoked sturgeon, chive tater tot, caviar, chervil

To the extent the term ‘god is in the details’ can be applied to food, specifically to the food created in both Barndiva kitchens, the prix fixe dinners we served NYE were not exclusive. Incredibly delicious, check. A joy to behold, see for yourself. But on par they followed an arc well established by Ryan Fancher. To cook with layered complexity ‘à la minute’ you need to master split second timing and coordinate multiple stages of a dish. His belief in an uncompromising mastery of prep starts long before a single dish reaches the table. From the moment raw product arrives at our kitchen door, through chopping, slicing, mincing, shredding, carving, poaching, sautéing, frying, rolling, baking, braising, simmering, steaming, whipping, (I could go on, it is seriously insane) a plethora of ingredients must be nurtured to a point of suspension and held at the ready, before the final act begins. In those last moments everything has to come together - perfect temperature, brightness of flavor, presentation - or that satisfactory moment of ‘à la minute’ loses its hot little heart of pleasure.

The A Team:  Deron, CJ, Thomas, Ryan, Andrew, Abel. 

The A Team:  Deron, CJ, Thomas, Ryan, Andrew, Abel. 

This is a crazy business when you are dedicated to capturing and extending what I’d call original flavor. But each and every day I've spent documenting (and eating) the food that comes out of our kitchens what I experience is a consistent, ego-less respect for what happens when rigorous labor and great ingredients meet. This is where the true alchemy of ‘fine’ dining begins. Ryan is the inspiration and always at the helm, but he’d be the first to issue deference to teamwork. His ability to teach and uphold standards of perfection is what makes him a great chef.

Roasted king quail, mushroom ragout, bacon, frisée

Roasted king quail, mushroom ragout, bacon, frisée

New Year's Eve we had two menus: they were not in competition, and there was nothing experimental about them - that wasn’t the intent. Below the different streams of energy and design we’ve created in the Barn and the Bistro, which flow from a desire to perfect and deliver nuanced approaches to different styles of dining,  our course  is to consistently re-create and extend classic flavor profiles we are wired to love. If that seems simple, well, it’s not. You are the judge of any success we enjoy. Looking around both dining rooms on NYE it was clear we ended the year on a high.

Chilled lobster salad, BD farm pea shoots, fingerling potato chips

Chilled lobster salad, BD farm pea shoots, fingerling potato chips

Pastry chef Scott Noll's chocolate butter pecan 'bomb'bon

Pastry chef Scott Noll's chocolate butter pecan 'bomb'bon

As our staff takes up their positions in the kitchens and the dining rooms after a much needed week off, we look forward to welcoming you in 2018 with continued enthusiasm for our mission. Because we understand, like never before, the importance of joyful dining in troubling times.

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